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New weed in California – African spiderflower (Cleome gynandra)

African spiderflower on fallow ground at the research farm

Dr. Mohsen Mesgaran, who joined the Weed Science Group this year as our weed ecophysiologist, found this plant growing on the research farm at UC Davis. African spiderflower is a summer annual broadleaf plant in the caper family (Cleomaceae), growing...

Posted on Friday, July 20, 2018 at 1:29 PM

UC and Israel sign agricultural research agreement

From left, Ermias Kebreab, Eli Feinerman and Mark Bell sign agreement for Israel and California scientists to collaborate more on water-related research and education.

Pledging to work together to solve water scarcity issues, Israel's Agricultural Research Organization signed a memorandum of understanding with UC Division of Agriculture and Natural Resources and UC Davis on July 16. The signing ceremony kicked off the 2018 Future of Water for Irrigation in California and Israel Workshop at the UC ANR building in Davis.

“Israel and California agriculture face similar challenges, including drought and climate change,” said Doug Parker, director of UC ANR's California Institute for Water Resources. “In the memorandum of understanding, Israel's Agricultural Research Organization, UC Davis and UC ANR pledge to work together more on research involving water, irrigation, technology and related topics that are important to both water-deficit countries.” 

The agreement will enhance collaboration on research and extension for natural resources management in agriculture, with an emphasis on soil, irrigation and water resources, horticulture, food security and food safety.

“It's a huge pleasure for us to sign an MOU with the world leaders in agricultural research like UC Davis and UC ANR,” said Eli Feinerman, director of Agricultural Research Organization of Israel. “When good people, smart people collaborate the sky is the limit.”

From left, Ermias Kebreab, Eli Feinerman, Karen Ross, Shlomi Kofman and Mark Bell. “We need the answers of best practices that come from academia," Ross said.

Feinerman, Mark Bell, UC ANR vice provost, and Ermias Kebreab, UC Davis professor and associate vice provost of academic programs and global affairs, represented their respective institutions for the signing. Karen Ross, California Department of Food and Agriculture secretary, and Shlomi Kofman, Israel's consul general to the Pacific Northwest, joined in celebrating the partnership.

“The important thing is to keep working together and develop additional frameworks that can bring the people of California and Israel together as researchers,” Kofman said. “But also to work together to make the world a better place.” 

Ross said, “It's so important for us to find ways and create forums to work together because water is the issue in this century and will continue to be.”

She noted that earlier this year the World Bank and United Nations reported that 40 percent of the world population is living with water scarcity.  “Over 700,000 people are at risk of relocation due to water scarcity,” Ross said. “We're already seeing the refugee issues that are starting to happen because of drought, food insecurity and the lack of water.”

Ross touted the progress stemming from CDFA's Healthy Soils Program to promote healthy soils on California's farmlands and ranchlands and SWEEP, the State Water Efficiency and Enhancement Program, which has provided California farmers $62.7 million in grants for irrigation systems that reduce greenhouse gases and save water on agricultural operations.

“We need the answers of best practices that come from academia, through demonstration projects so that our farmers know what will really work,” Ross said.

Scientists from Israel and California met to exchange ideas for managing water for agriculture.

As Parker opened the water workshop, sponsored by the U.S./Israel Binational Agricultural Research and Development (BARD) Program, Israel Agricultural Research Organization and UC ANR, he told the scientists, “The goal of this workshop is really to be creating new partnerships, meeting new people, networking, and finding ways to work together in California with Israel, in Israel, with other parts of the world as well.”

Drawing on current events, Bell told the attendees, “If you look at the World Cup, it's about effort, it's about teamwork, it's about diversity of skills, and I think that's what this event does. It brings together those things.”

 

Posted on Friday, July 20, 2018 at 9:42 AM

Sustainable You! 2018

Hello All,

For those who don't know me, my name is Rachel Wingler and I am the summer intern at Hopland REC. Through my internship I have had the opportunity to work on and help plan the Sustainable You Summer Camp. This summer camp is a week-long science and sustainability camp for children ages 9-12. This year we even offered an overnight option on one of the nights which involved a night drive around HREC to find animals and smores. This years' camp had 18 campers. That is a lot for two camp coordinators and our lovely volunteers. Nevertheless, we had an incredible week. From interesting speakers, bioblitz dancing, drone presentations, farmer visits, and wildlife biologists to garden box making, solar car racing, smoothie bike making and trail camera placing we had such an exciting week. We really want to thank all of our scholarship donors who contributed to our camp and allowed some campers to come who otherwise might not have been able to. These donors include, Dan Baxter, Deanna Goff, Richard and Lisa Black, Sonoma Clean Power, South Ukiah Rotary, Trish Wingler, and Ukiah Rotary. Without you all this camp would have been short a few kids and we are so thankful to have had them all as a part of our camp.

When I first applied for this job I really didn't know fully what I was getting myself into. After this spectacular experience I couldn't be more thankful to Hopland REC for giving me the opportunity to work with this organization. I specifically want to thank Hannah Bird for being so hard working and so interested in the well being of the youth in the community. Working on the planning and then getting to see the execution of all the hard work during the week of camp was more than I could have ever imagined. For anyone who has considered putting time in whether paid or volunteer at HREC, DO IT! You will not be disappointed by your experience. I mean just look at these faces...

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Needless to say, this whole experience has been one of my greatest memories and I hope it will be for the campers as well. Sustainable You Summer Camp is such a positive thing for the youngsters in this community and in surrounding communities. If you ever send your child to Sustainable You Summer Camp, you can rest assured that a lot of hard work and heart was put into it. The photo above was taken on Friday, during the camper's last trip to the creek bed. The trail cameras were placed in the creek bed all week by the campers. For now I will keep it semi-short and sweet. Goodbye for now!

  -Rachel Wingler (Summer Intern)

Posted on Friday, July 20, 2018 at 9:32 AM

USDA awards UC and Karuk Tribe $1.2 million for collaborative research and education to increase tribal ecosystem resilience in a changing climate

The USDA-funded Tribal Food Security Project team includes members of the Karuk, Yurok and Klamath Tribes along with UC researchers. In front row, Jennifer Sowerwine is second from left and UCCE farm advisor Deborah Giraud is far right. Photo courtesy of Karuk Píkyav Field Institute.

As California and the nation grapple with the implications of persistent drought, devastating wildfires and other harbingers of climate change, researchers at UC Berkeley's College of Natural Resources and the Karuk Tribe are building on a decade-long partnership to learn more about stewarding native food plants in fluctuating environmental conditions. UC Berkeley and the Karuk Tribe have been awarded a $1.2 million USDA Agriculture and Food Research Initiative grant for field research, new digital data analysis tools and community skill-building aimed to increase resilience of the abundant cultural food and other plant resources – and the tribal people whose food security and health depend on them.

Jennifer Sowerwine, UC Cooperative Extension specialist at UC Berkeley and co-founder of the Karuk-UC Berkeley Collaborative, and Lisa Hillman, program manager of the Karuk Tribe's Píkyav Field Institute, will co-lead the xúus nu'éethti – we are caring for it research project.

UC Berkeley's College of Natural Resources, UC Agriculture and Natural Resources and the Karuk Department of Natural Resources will support the project with postdoctoral researchers, botany, mapping and GIS specialists, and tribal cultural practitioners and resource technicians. The San Rafael-based nonprofit Center for Digital Archaeology will help develop a new data modeling system.

Project activities include expanding the tribe's herbarium (a research archive of preserved cultural plants launched in 2016 with UC Berkeley support), developing digital tools to collect and store agroecological field data, and helping tribal community members and youth learn how to analyze the results.

“For the xúus nu'éethti – we are caring for it research project, UC ANR's Informatics and Geographic Information Systems (IGIS) team will lead hands-on workshops and consultations to build Karuk Tribal capacity to assess, monitor and make management decisions regarding the agroecosystem,” Sowerwine said. “Workshop curricula for tribal staff and community members will include GIS training, 360 photospheres and drone images, and storymapping techniques. ​IGIS will also provide technical analysis of historical land use and land cover records to support researchers' understanding of agroecological resilience over time.”

Sowerwine, right, shown cleaning tanoak mushrooms, an important cultural food, will study effects of climate change on the Karuk food system.

“We are delighted to continue our connection with UC Berkeley through this new project,” said Hillman. “Through our past collaboration on tribal food security, we strengthened a network of tribal folks knowledgeable in identifying, monitoring, harvesting, managing for and preparing the traditional foods that sustain us physically and culturally. With this new project, we aim to integrate variables such as climate change, plant pathogens and invasive species into our research and management equations, learning new skills and knowledge along the way and sharing those STEM skills with the next generation.”

The research team will assess the condition of cultural agroecosystems including foods and fibers to understand how land use, land management, and climate variables have affected ecosystem resilience. Through planning designed to maximize community input, they will develop new tools to inform land management choices at the federal, state, tribal and community levels.

All project activities will take place in the Karuk Tribe's Aboriginal Territory located in the mid-Klamath River Basin, but results from the project will be useful to other tribes and entities working toward sustainable management of cultural natural resources in an era of increasing climate variability. Findings will be shared nationwide through cooperative extension outreach services and publications.

The new project's name, xúus nu'éethti – we are caring for it, reflects the Karuk Tribe's continuing commitment to restore and enhance the co-inhabitants of its aboriginal territory whom they know to be their relations – plants, animals, fish, water, rocks and land. At the core of Karuk identity is the principle of reciprocity: one must first care for these relations in order to receive their gifts for future generations.

This work will be supported by the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative Resilient Agroecosystems in a Changing Climate Challenge Area, grant no. 2018-68002-27916 from the USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture.

For more information, visit the Karuk – UC Berkeley Collaborative website at https://nature.berkeley.edu/karuk-collaborative

Posted on Wednesday, July 18, 2018 at 2:33 PM

Leafhopper Parasitism Update - July 2018

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On July 9 we surveyed parasitism of Western grape leafhopper (WGLH) and Virginia creeper leafhopper (VCLH) across 9 sites in Mendocino and Lake counties (Fig. 1). WGLH parasitism was fairly consistent (average 38%), but there was little to no VCLH...

Posted on Tuesday, July 17, 2018 at 9:29 AM

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